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100 BEST BRITISH FILMS – Time Out London

February 10, 2012

100 BRITISH FILMS

A few days ago, I found this list compiled by Time Out. There are a lot of lists in Internet –British love it!-, but I liked it so much because there are an interesting mix between classics and cult movies. I thought that you could been interesting in it and I share in our blog.

Watching movies is a good way to practice our English. Evidently, we must watch them with subtitles.

PS. The list has a good structure like a mosaic.

http://www.timeout.com/london/bestbritishfilms/

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16 comments

  1. A very interesting link, ideed, altough many of this films I didn’t know, and others, I think they shouldn’t be there! Why Brief Encounter is not in the first places, or Great Expectations? Why The Jungle Book, The Thief of Baghdad and Anna Karenina are not in the list? Why is not The Charge of the Ligth Brigade? To much Kubrick in this list, very little Hitchcock and very litle Korda, Pressburger and Powell, but even so, it’s very interesting!


  2. It is very simple: because there are only a hundred films and it is impossible to resume the history of the British cinema in a so limited list, however this ranking was voted by British criticism and has surprises like the number one, “Don’t look back”, one of more bizarre and perturbing films I’ve seen in my life.


  3. Of course. But I have the feeling that they are many classic films missing, or neglected in this list. “Don’t look back”, I never heard about this fim. I am afraid I am dated.
    Thank you again for your commentaries. Have a nice weekend.


  4. I go along with Rosa about Brief Encounter…it is such a lovely film!


  5. Notice of the day:singer and actress Whitney Houston passes at the age of 48. That is what you get when you take drugs and mix with wrong people.

    May she rest at peace.


  6. Good afternoon!
    Thanks, Antonio, for the post. It is a very interesting list and I like the way that “Time Out” shows us. I´ve read it very quickly but It is surprising that “Don´t look back” would be the number one. I´ve seen this film twice (in spanish, unfortunately) and it is a very disturbing -but excellent- film. But I thought that it was not as well known than other popular films, at least to be the first one!


  7. Hello again!
    If anybody wants to wach “Don´t look back”, it is in some of the public library of Comunidad de Madrid. Its spanish title is “Amenaza en la sombra”. I´ll take it some day to see it in english!!
    Good sunday afternoon!


  8. Mar, the list is very particular because is full of surprises (like the number one), but they are good surprises. This is the cause I posted it and because this mosaic shows a quick look around British cinema. “Don’t look now” is not the best British movie… but it is a very personal film.

    About the sadest new of the day, Whitney Houston had a beautiful voice! Very beutiful but her life was an absolute disaster. Drugs worked against her, but I wouldn’t blame them of everything. Keith Richards or Mike Jagger, for example, take drugs since they were teenagers and are alive and kicking. Perhaps she had bad luck in her life and she was not as strong as she seemed, her husband was a bad influence over her (Bobby Brown is devil), etc…
    Remembering her like the magnificent superstar she was is the best tribute we can do for keeping alive her memory.


  9. Well, a beatiful woman and a great singer she was (altough I must confess I didn’t like The Bodyguard). I can’t help, when I heard the history of her life, to think about Maria Callas, another grear singer who had a sad ending because she married the wrong person… And surely we could provide more examples of woman (like Camille Claudel) who spoilt their lives and talents because they chose to live with the wrong men…


  10. I am afraid I am a bit like the Phantom of the Opera, and I think that when a woman has a gift, she musn’t have another love, but her art.

    Good nigth.


  11. What a quote, Rosa!! I really like it!! If only “our” art loved us back!!

    May she rest in peace… Poor Whitney, she was a great singer


  12. Why, but it was from a silent film (The Lon Chaney’s version of The Phantom of the Opera)!

    Have a nice week.


  13. first of all thanks, Antonio for the link, how interesting and…I did not know that “gone with the wind” or rather the director was considered a blunder, I absolutely LOVE that film, which probably shows that I am ignorant, ahem, totally ignorant of right and wrong in films!!!


  14. Well, when they were doing “Gone with the wind”, they had an incredible amount of problems, and the studio changed the director several times. By the way, although 1939 was a terrible year, it was fantastic for the films, because many great films were made or opened for the first time then: Gone with the Wind, The Wizard of Oz, The Thief of Baghdad, the Stagecoach, Elizabeth and Essex, Mr Smith goes to Washington, Goodbye Mr Chips, Dark Victory, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Jamaica’s Inn, The roaring Twenties, Ninotchka, Of mice and men, The Spy in Black, The Story of the Last Chrisantemus, The Tower of London, Tarzan and his son, Wuthering Higths…and so on, and so go …If you are interested in Gone With the Wind, I would recommend you the books Este rodaje es la guerra y Se las llevó el viento.

    Have a good day.


  15. Good nigth. Antonio, I have The Great Expectations DVD (in English, with English subtitles, in Spain this film is called “Cadenas rotas”, I don’t know why, and I think you can find it in department stores and points of selling of press -mine was given with a magazine-). If you want to talk with me about it, I’ll be waiting the next Monday at the turn of the classes (the Wednesday I don’t know if I am coming). I think I probably will able to go to the Dickens think, but I am not sure, I expect no not have any unexpected thing.


  16. Wow! It would be great, Rosa. The film is not on store in Spain at this moment and I will buy it by Amazon. We can speak next day in class. Thank you!



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